Courses of interest to students seeking graduate or undergraduate classes on racism and public health are available via the UCLA registrar. Below are selected popular courses by department. Check with the UCLA registrar for availability.

 

+ CHICANO/CHICANA STUDIES (CHICANO)

CHICANO 157. CHICANO MOVEMENT AND ITS POLITICAL LEGACIES

Collective examination of Chicano Movement of 1960s and 1970s and analysis of its political legacies. Grounded in historiographic inquiry and social movement theory, investigation of mobilization of diverse sectors of "el movimiento," including students, workers, artists, youth, community activists, and women. Exploration of myriad issues and struggles that compelled Chicanas/Chicanos to resist such as land and labor rights, education, anti-war movements, community autonomy, police brutality, political inclusion, cultural recovery, racism, sexism, and class exploitation. Investigation of diverse ideologies, debates, and legacies of Chicano Movement through analysis of Chicana/Chicano motivations for organizing, modes, strategies, innovations, challenges, and articulation of new political subjectivities.


+ COMMUNITY HEALTH SCIENCES (CHS)

CHS 220. RACISM AND PUBLICH HEALTH: SOCIAL EPIDEMIOLOGICAL APPROACHES

Integration of social epidemiologic methods and critical approaches to study of racial stratification and public health, with focus on (1) conceptualizing racism-related factors as social determinants of health, (2) building methodological competence for conducting research on racism as social determinant of health, and (3) developing critical self-consciousness to better understand how persons' racial- or racism-related perspectives and experiences might inform their research.

CHS 235. INFLUENCE OF SOCIAL AND PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT ON RACIAL HEALTH DISPARITIES

Examination of how community stressors and neighborhood resources may contribute to health disparities. Discussion of multiple factors that contribute to environmental injustice and their potential solutions. Do health disparities arise because minorities and low-income populations live in harmful environments? Is relationship between environment and health disparities merely one of potential exposure to chemical/physical hazards, or are there psychosocial mechanisms at community level that act above or beyond effects of physical environment?

CHS 239. RACE, ETHNICITY, AND CULTURE AS CONCEPTS IN PRACTICE AND RESEARCH

Integration of cross-cultural findings in healthcare with current American (U.S.) healthcare system paradigms to facilitate designing culturally based public health programs and train culturally competent practitioners.

CHS 290. RACE, CLASS, CULTURE, AND AGING

Experience of aging for African American, Latino, and Asian elderly examined in context of their families, communities, and nation. Exploration of cultural and structural influences on health and lived experiences of those elders.

CHS 296. CRITICAL RACE THEORY IN PUBLIC HEALTH

Graduate-level course that introduces students in Public Health and other health sciences to Critical Race Theory (CRT). CRT originated as such in the field of Law. While students will learn about CRT’s origin within Law, the course will focus primarily on critical race approaches for advancing equity through Public Health research and practice.

CHS 497. HEALTH DISPARITIES, HEALTH EQUITY & SEXUAL MINORITY POPULATIONS

Examination of health disparities affecting sexual minority populations, category that includes lesbians, gay men, bisexuals, and transgender (LGBT) persons. Use of Healthy People 2010 Companion Document for LGBT Health to outline key health issues and national recommendations for achieving reductions in each area. Discussion of considerations for providing clinical care and public health practice in this population, unique social and contextual factors influencing LGBT health, and methodological issues for conducting research among LGBT persons.


+ EDUCATION

EDU 204D. Minority Education in Cross Cultural Perspectives: A Seminar in Critical Race Theory in Education

This course provides an overview of a framework called Critical Race Theory. Our goal is to examine the framework as it developed in the field of education and how it has been advanced in the law, sociology, social welfare, geography, public health, and the humanities. Critical Race Theory in Education Is an explanatory framework or set of basic perspectives, methods, and pedagogy that accounts for the role of race and racism in education and that works toward identifying and challenging racism within education as part of a larger goal of identifying and challenging all forms of subordination.

EDUC 274. SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, AND SOCIAL RESEARCH AFTER EUROCENTRISM

Philosophy of natural sciences for social scientists that examines challenges to conventional research assumptions raised by multicultural and postcolonial science and technology studies that have emerged since World War II. Focus on sciences and technologies in third-world development projects, comparative ethnoscience movements, and new theories of knowledge and how to do maximally objective research emerging from these literatures.

EDUC 275. RACE AND EDUCATION

Examination of role of race in educational policymaking. Exploration of broad interpretation of how schools contribute to racial stratification and inequality by linking sociological and sociopsychological theories of race, racial attitudes, and conflict to historical policy analysis.

EDUC 283. SOCIAL RESEARCH IN MULTICULTURAL AND POSTCOLONIAL WORLD

Philosophy of social sciences that focuses on how to think fruitfully about two issues: (1) inevitability of nonneutral procedures and results of research conducted within liberal state that must be committed to value-neutrality and (2) challenges that multicultural and postcolonial social theory have raised to conventional research theories and methodologies.


+ LAW

LAW 266. CRITICAL RACE THEORY

To understand the deep interconnections between race and law, and particularly the ways in which race and law are mutually constitutive, is an extraordinary intellectual challenge. That is precisely the project of Critical Race Theory (CRT). This course will pursue this project by exploring the emerging themes within CRT. Contrary to the traditional notion that racial subordination represents a deviation from the liberal legal ideal, this body of work recasts the role of law as historically central to and complicit in upholding racial hierarchy as well hierarchies of gender, class, and sexual orientation, among others. We will focus on the origins of the critique and the contrasts between CRT and liberal and conservative analytical frameworks on race and American Law and society. We will also examine some of the questions and criticisms raised about CRT, from both inside and outside of the genre, as well as the impact of the work on legal and political discourse. The point of departure for the course is an exploration of race itself--what exactly is race?--and the role law plays in constructing this identity.

LAW 619. ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE LAW

This course will cover the development, theories, and practice of environmental justice law, specifically analyzing the legal and policy tools used by advocates to advance environmental justice. Key topics to be covered are: the intersection between race and the environment, and class and the environment; the relationship between traditional environmental movements and environmental justice movements; the relationship between science and policy; current litigation strategies and environmental justice policies; the use of natural resource law in environmental justice cases; and, the use of civil rights law for environmental justice concerns. Focus is on U.S. and California law.


+ PSYCHOLOGY

PSYCH 175. COMMUNITY PSYCHOLOGY

Application of psychological principles to understanding and solution of community problems. Topics include community development, community mental health problems, drugs, racism, and rehabilitation of prisoners.

PSYCH 274. HEALTH STATUS & HEALTH BEHAVIORS OF RACIAL & ETHNIC MINORITY POPULATIONS

Overview of physical and mental health behaviors and status of major racial/ethnic groups in U.S. Where appropriate, discussion of international issues as well.


+ SOCIETY & GENETICS

SOCGEN 121. RACE, SCIENCE, AND CITIZENSHIP

Early development of scientific method and systematic exclusion of those in subordinate social groups from scientific practice. Interrogation of binaries that prop up scientific knowledge construction, and consideration of how norms and values embedded in Western science compare with indigenous or local knowledge systems. How medical research is motivated by competing assumptions of racial hierarchy and equality. Examination of governments' use of science to classify racially inferior and contaminated foreigners as threats to socio-natural order. Exploration of how people use knowledge about their embodied experiences to demand rights and accept responsibility for their own health and vitality, either in opposition to or alliance with scientific experts. How contemporary developments in science and technology bring to light some central concerns of social and political theory.


+ SOCIOLOGY

SOC 40. AMERICAN RACISM: PSYCHOSOCIAL ANALYSIS

Examination of long-standing history of American racism, beginning with institution of slavery, Jim Crow legislation, separate but equal doctrine, Brown versus Board of Education, Civil Rights legislation of 1960s, and Obama presidency. Focus on persistence over time of racist beliefs and mechanisms through which racism becomes passed on from one generation to next. Racism toward African Americans and harms it has inflicted on African American community, as well as on nation as whole. Examination of psychology and sociology of racism through video clips, social scientific texts, essays by prominent American humanists, and American literature that deals centrally with racism.

SOC 191L. UNDERGRADUATE SEMINAR: ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE AND SUSTAINABILITY

Sociological approach to study of environmental issues and problems. Topics include ecopolitics and ecofeminism, environmental racism, global environmental change, sustainable development, and society-environment interface. Reading, discussion, and development of culminating project.


+ URBAN PLANNING

URBN PL 141. PLANNING WITH MINORITY COMMUNITIES

Overview of planning history, theory, and contemporary issues that affect low-income communities, communities of color, and underserved neighborhoods, particularly in Los Angeles area. Field of planning offers distinct perspectives and opportunities for improving vulnerable communities. Topics range from discussion of intersection between race and income, critical race theory, community development, residential segregation, spatial mismatch, and environmental justice to social justice.

URBN PL 167. ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE THROUGH MULTIPLE LENSES

Examination of intersection between race, economic class, and environment in U.S., with focus on issues related to social justice. Because environmental inequality is highly complex phenomenon, multidisciplinary and multipopulation approach taken, using alternative ways of understanding, interpreting, and taking action.

URBN PL M203. HOUSING SEGREGATION, HOUSING DISCRIMINATION, AND EVOLUTION OF PUBLIC POLICY

Consideration of selected aspects of housing law and policy, including current federal and state housing subsidies; remedies of housing consumers; impacts of market discrimination against children, racial minorities, and women; and local governmental laws influencing cost and supply, such as anti-speculation and rent control legislation. Catalytic role of economic and community development in expansion of housing supply also considered.

URBN PL 242. POVERTY AND INEQUALITY

Examination of relationship between urbanization and spatial inequality in U.S. -- spatial dynamics of urban growth, levels and causes of spatial inequality, and implications of spatial inequality for low-income communities. Topics include concentrated poverty, residential segregation, immigrant neighborhoods, spatial disparities in access to opportunities, housing mobility, neighborhood health and safety, urban infrastructure, and political cohesion and participation. Analysis of role of policies in promoting and/or reducing spatial inequities.